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Eaton Hall's garden completes its 24-year-long restoration project

The Eaton Estate is a sight to behold. Originally constructed in the 1440s for the opulent Grosvenor family, near Chester, U.K., the halls were torn down and then rebuilt between 1960 and 1973, then altered again in 1991, according to the estate's website. But the location's true wealth arguably lies in its abundant gardens, which were the subject of a decades-long renovation process and have only recently been completed. The result is breathtaking.
The renovation, led by Arabella Lennox-Boyd Landscape Design, took over 24 years according to the Society of Garden Designers Awards' website and covers 88 acres of land. The project took into account the needs for both pleasing aesthetics and 21st-century convenience. Let's take a tour.
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Lead landscape designer Arabella Lennox-Boyd is one of the most prominent artists in her field. She has done work all over the world, according to her personal website, including but not limited to England, Hong Kong and Spain, her brilliant work adapting to each and every circumstance.
"My focus was to soften the gardens and to draw you from the house into the landscape," Lennox-Boyd says on the Eaton Estate website. "I wanted the gardens to be visually beautiful throughout the seasons, with interesting and appealing features, to reflect its setting as a family home."
The gardens seem to form a perfect balance between sharp, maintained structures and wild, lush foliage, allowing for a truly unique blend of sophistication and airiness.
The project won a prestigious restoration award last year. "The design builds upon exhaustive historical research but with an acknowledgement of current maintenance regimes and staffing levels," the Society of Garden Designers Awards judges have said. "The result is traditional, contemporary, ecological and practical in equal measure and provides a legacy for future generations."
"The four quadrants of the Rose Garden evoke the intimacy of four small rooms and create a sense of mystery within an otherwise large, exposed open space," Lennox-Boyd says of the section pictured above.
Lennox-Boyd's ability to adapt to present-day maintenance and staffing concerns has allowed the gardens' staff to go from 65 in the early 1900s to 11 nowadays, thanks in part to more machine-assisted routines than in the past. 
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What do you think of these gardens? Let us know in the comments section and make sure to share with your friends.
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